Persistence Pays Off

Recruitment can get a bad rep, but it also has many redeeming qualities that keep someone there. You work with so many exciting organizations to find amazing talent and would also be helping people to find jobs — so why would you ever get a bad rep, since you’re doing an amazing work!  You will have many memorable stories involving people who have been struggling with their job search, or companies that desperately need someone quickly. That’s where you guys come in.

Of course, there is always room for improvement

How can you ensure that you get the right candidates answering you? You need to be persistent. You need to push back. But there’s a fine line between being tough in defense of what’s right and being too harsh, which is something you’d struggle with constantly. Finding the line between helpful and pushy is the key to success; you need to know when to push candidates to take risks and when to back down. In order to do this, you need to truly know your candidates — and your clients.

You will sometime find it difficult to be persistent with people and will find a way to get over that feeling, but still question, how many times are you allowed to reach out to someone? Some ways that you could overcome these concerns are by doing extensive research on each person’s background to ensure you’re bringing something valuable to the table. You should also realize that in those 10 + calls a day from different recruiters, you have done the best job finding something relevant and appealing to them. You have taken the time to research their backgrounds, interests, and projects they have done. In the end, they appreciate your call (even if they are not looking!) and that’s how you build a relationship. While it’s not an easy job, it is rewarding. As said, why would you ever get a bad rep, you’re doing amazing work!

So how many times IS too many to follow up? If you can connect with someone, being persistent is easy. You consistently follow up with people 4–5 times, in an effort to make that connection. Persistence, not pushy. There is a fine, but very important, line between the two.

Being in recruitment, being persistent, following up, and pushing back is a vital part of being a good salesperson — as long as you’re doing it in the right way.

Nurturing Your Super Stars

Nurturing your top performers is critical to the long term success of your business. Don’t believe it? Take a look at these statistics.

  • Top performers produce as much as 10 times more than the average worker, while they often require less than two times the pay (Sullivan, 2012)
  • Top performers produce up to 12 times more than the average employee (Corporate Executive Board)
  • The top performer differential is 2.5 to 10 times that of an average employee (Sullivan, 2008)
  • The more top performers you have, the greater the organization’s productivity!

Managers give all of their attention to the weak players – those who need to improve. They draw us in again and again, receiving the regular feedback. But, what about top performers? You may feel that by leaving them alone, you’re paying them the greatest compliment. This is exactly the opposite of what we should be doing and what they are expecting. It’s a fact that organization’s top talent can have the easiest time finding other employment.

So, make a fresh commitment to give them the time, the feedback, and the opportunity to grow in your organization and  nurture them to contribute to the overall growth of your organization.

“The more you know about your employees, the better coach and leader you can be.”

There are many ways to help you understand your employees, motivate them for long-term satisfaction, and to help them overcome weaknesses and making them even better at their jobs.

  • Identify your “A” Players

In an organization, “A” players or “top talent” are typically those with the best performance ratings. Defining top talent should go beyond this single measure. Characteristics and behaviours may also help you to identify these talent among your employees. Some common examples include:

  • Positive energy/attitude
  • Entrepreneurial spirit
  • Innovation or creativity
  • Commitment to your startup’s culture and mission
  • Effective communication skills
  • Integrity
  • Teamwork
  • Customer focus and empathy
  • Leadership
  • Potential for growth
  • Job expertise and skills
  • Analytical skills
  • Commitment to deliver
  • A strong work ethic
  • Decision-making skills

Once you have identified the key characteristics or behaviours, measure your employees against these expectations and get a 360° feedback from the managers.

  • Focus on Motivational Dynamics

Once you’ve identified your organization’s top talent, it’s important to focus on the motivational dynamics. Motivational dynamics have changed dramatically to reflect new work requirements and changed worker expectations.

One of the biggest changes has been the rise in importance of psychic, or intrinsic rewards, and the decline of material or extrinsic rewards. Extrinsic rewards—usually financial—are the tangible rewards given employees by managers, such as pay raises, bonuses, and benefits. They are called “extrinsic” because they are external to the work itself and other people control their size and whether or not they are granted. In contrast, intrinsic rewards are psychological rewards that employees get from doing meaningful work and performing it well. Because intrinsic rewards are intangible, they usually arise from within the person who is doing the activity or behavior. Some examples of intrinsic reward includes:

  • Provide meaningful work
  • Allow workers to make choices through a high level of autonomy
  • Provide opportunities for employees to show their competence in areas of expertise
  • Facilitate professional development so that employees can expand on their level of knowledge
  • Offer frequent opportunities for employees to reward themselves
  • Allow employees the opportunity to connect with those with whom they serve to obtain valuable feedback
  • Give them a path to monitor their progress with milestones along the way

Before you can take action to nurture your top talent, you need to take time to get to know them as individuals and discover what motivates and engages them. Once you know this, it can be fairly easy to address their needs.

  • Provide Continuous Development

Just like all other employees, your top talent need opportunities for development and career growth. If companies are truly serious about retaining, and developing high-quality talent, they need to view themselves as growth platforms where people can develop themselves faster than they could elsewhere. It’s also important to nurture an individual’s development in areas where they are less strong, in order to allow them to make greater use of their strengths. Growth opportunities should occur on the job where employees can learn from coworkers and associates. This on-the-job model of learning can enable people to continually acquire relevant skills and tacit knowledge in their domain.

  • Make them Feel Truly Valued

Employee recognition isn’t rocket science. One of your most important responsibilities of the management is to make your employees feel truly valued, letting them know that without them, your company, your department—and frankly, you—would be worse off.

To effectively convey this, think about how you approach everyday conversations with your employees. When you assign a new task, for example, go beyond the basic and reiterate why you truly value their work. While it’s important for top performers to know they are valued by their organizations, they also need to know that their contributions are underpinned by many other people. Acknowledging the value and contributions of all employees helps your “A” team understand their place on the team and helps all employees endeavour for better performance.